Sasquatch A O D

Bigfoot Sasquatch AOD

AOD means “Atlanto Occipital Dislocation” is often referred to de-capitation. AOD is an ancient time tested, practiced method of incapacitating your quarry and it is a perfected strategy meeting modern resolve like a courtesy card saying Sorry, I missed your calls. I’ll call back again. It conveys a subtle and unmistakable message to brand its handy work.
When you read and analyze reports you critique yourself. You look for factors to count or discount one or more known (emphasis on known) factors and attributes of Sasquatch behavior i.e. tracks, location of previous history or previous sightings, stick or tree formation, vocals etc. You begin to see the motif as distinctive features repeating itself over and you connect the dots and the picture becomes clearer each time. Nothing is a coincidence. Nothing is left for chance. Nothing is random. Everything has meaning. This is their calling card… This is similar to those business cards you professionals leave at the door “Hello, sorry I missed you, I’ll call back again soon,” sort of reminder of their handy work.
AOD Time tested, practiced and perfected on animals then people
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All animals killed by head injuries and having their necks broken or twisted
  • 2011 Fall Pasco County, Florida
Bigfoot chased and grabbed antler of buck and pulled it close grabbed the other antler and snapped its neck
  • 1997 October northeastern North Dakota
Bigfoot broke the neck of coyote ate half of it, leaving lots of blood and coyote hair around
  • 1990 September 19, Cannon Beach, Clatsop County, Oregon
Bigfoot seized the horse and broke its neck
  • 1895 July 30, Newburg, New York
Carcass of calves dead with broken necks in barn
  • 1990 Summer Commerce, Delta County, Texas
Famer found his full-grown goat, dead of a broken neck
  • 1978 December 21, Toluca, North Carolina
Found 3 wolves killed where each one had been bludgeoned and had broken necks
  • 1977 Fall Oregon
May be a black-and-white image of tree and outdoors

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